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Summary Edit

Ulmus parvifolia is a climate-tolerant native of Taiwan, China, and Korea. In nature these trees can reach a height of 60-70 feet and may live 100 years or more. Sometimes confused with Zelkova – Japanese Elm – the two can be differentiated by their fruits and leaves.

The Chinese Elm has winged fruit, whereas the Japanese Elm has unwinged, and Chinese Elm has double-toothed leaves compared to the single-toothed leaves of Japanese.

Ulmus is an excellent bonsai tree and is sometimes referred to as being almost impossible to kill, making it a good choice for beginners. There are several varieties, all appropriate for the art-form. These trees may be evergreen or deciduous, depending upon their environment.

Tree's Attributes:

The leaves of this Elm are small, a desirable trait for shaping purposes. The trunk is typically slim, with bark that varies significantly among the different types.

'Hokkaido' is a favorite among enthusiasts for its corky bark, fast growth, and tiny leaves. It is one of the more delicate cultivars so be very cautious when wiring.

'Dynasty' is also a great choice, with small leaves and smooth, gray bark. If allowed to be deciduous, the leaves on 'Dynasty' will turn red in autumn.

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current20:12, April 24, 2017Thumbnail for version as of 20:12, April 24, 2017542 × 600 (127 KB)Uaebonsai (Talk | contribs)Ulmus parvifolia is a climate-tolerant native of Taiwan, China, and Korea. In nature these trees can reach a height of 60-70 feet and may live 100 years or more. Sometimes confused with Zelkova – Japanese Elm – the two can be differentiated by thei...

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